Analyzing two different sections of text – Whissell Dictionary

Measure the Feel of Language.

Adding your comments to your texts.
Ignoring punctuation
Ignoring words
The AA tag (breaking files into sections)
Using four-digit codes to make discreet analyses
Translating text from other languages for analysis
Words not found in the Whissell dictionary
Word Count
Spell Checker
References

Using Four-digit Codes to Analyze Different Sections Of The Same Text files.

You can compare two poems (for example) in one analysis.  If you paste into one text file, and give each section a different four-digit code.  The four-digit tag lets you analyze words gathered in different contexts, and compare them to each other.

You add the four-digit tags at the beginning of each section you’re examining, like this:

0001

words words words words words words words words words words words words

0002

words words words words words words words words words words words words

Software Option for four-digit tags. Click to see close-up.

Suppose you are studying the effects of a medication used to improve moods. In this example, you would use one text file for each subject. You ask your subjects to describe about how they’re feeling before they take the pills. You transcribe their remarks, and add them to a text file. You add the four-digit code “0001” to to all the words you collected from them before they took the pills.

Then, you talk to them again a few hours after they took the pills, and you ask them to talk about how they’re feeling again. The words you collect in that case are labeled “0002”.

The program will give you an analysis of all the sections marked with “0001” and “0002” in all the files. Then, you will have a summary of your subject’s language in two different circumstances.

You can add four-digit codes to your text files so that specified sections of text files can be analyzed together.

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